2019 Minocqua Turkey Trot 5K

2019 Minocqua Turkey Trot 5K – The race that will be forever known as the “YOU ASSHOLE!” race.

When:  11/28/2019

Where:  Torpy Park, Minocqua, Wisconsin

Distance:  5K-ish (actual distance was 2.9 miles)

Results:  21:16 / 13th Overall / 12th Place Male Overall / 1st Place M50-59 Age Group

Link to the Overall Results

The family was up north in Minocqua for Thanksgiving and four of us decided that doing the local turkey trot would be fun.  Ben had already looked at the previous results from last year and figured he could easily beat the winner’s time by a couple of minutes.  I was glad to see we could save a few bucks by signing up as a family, $90 for the four of us instead of $30 each on race day!  What we hadn’t planned on was the snowstorm the day before.

The snowstorm caused the race director to alter the course and eliminate the trail portion of the run.  The course was now changed to an out and back.  The town took care of the snow for the most part, but the sidewalk and the streets we would run on still had some snow.  Fortunately, due to the sand they throw around up there on the streets, the footing was pretty good.

So we all showed up, registered and then Kari and I went back to the car to keep warm while the real runners, Ben and Emily, went for a pre-race warm-up.

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Trying to stay warm on a cold upper Wisconsin Thanksgiving morning.

The start time approached and we all started gathering around the start banner.  Ben had keyed on a kid wearing a Ripon College cross country shirt and figured he would stay with him until the end and out-kick him.  Emily joined me and said she was going to run easy, which meant to go my pace, and I was glad to have the company.  Kari took her spot away from the front and then the countdown began.  8…  7…  6…  I hate when they do this because some guy always will jump the gun and go on 1, but here we were.  1…  GO!

The race start was narrow and fed us almost immediately into a more narrow sidewalk, and that is when the festive mood of the race changed for me.  A woman runner started to run almost directly at me from the left and I thought she was going to run into me so I held my arm up and kept her from bowling me over.

“YOU SHOVED ME, YOU ASSHOLE!”

For the record, I didn’t shove her.  She didn’t even lose her balance.  She just didn’t get to run into me like she was about to do.  I explained to her that I was just keeping her from knocking me down, but damn, she was angry enough about it to call me an asshole.  But now I was a little miffed.  When you are a slow runner you shouldn’t be starting at the front of the race where the faster runners belong, and if you are going to cut someone off you better understand that the person you are cutting off isn’t going to like it.  Why can’t these races just be fun and not end up with some weird, screwed-up occurrence?  Happy Thanksgiving to you too, lady.

So with that incident on my mind, I tried to find a comfortable pace to run and try not to slip and fall on the snow-covered sidewalk.  Emily and I made our way to the side street and to the turnaround point without any further issues.  There were a couple of younger guys ahead of me wearing turkey outfits and I decided that I didn’t want to get beat by a couple of turkeys, so I started working on pulling them in.   Emily had also decided to push ahead and leave me in her snowy dust.  The first turkey I caught pretty quickly but it wasn’t until about a half-mile left of the race that I caught the second one.  Another runner was ahead of me and I passed him as I was starting my last all-out kick, but he still had a kick left and then blew past me and started racing a high school kid up ahead that we were getting close to.  I finished alone without any further challenges.

I looked at my watch and saw that the GPS recorded a distance of 2.90 miles and Ben and Emily said the same.  The course was a little short, but no big deal.

Being called an “asshole” aside, it was a pretty good race for all four of us.  Ben implemented his race plan and waited until 20 feet left to take the air out of the other kid and beat him by a second, winning the race.  I think Ben enjoyed toying with his prey until the final moments.  He won’t deny it.  Emily was also first on the women’s side and both of them got turkeys for their wins.  Kari was also on the podium with a 3rd place in her age group.

When we got home I was explaining to everyone what I did to get called an “asshole” and I demonstrated what she did with my daughter Rebecca.  As I got close to Rebecca she instinctively put her arm up to keep me from running into her.  There, I am vindicated!

 

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Race Report: 2019 Short Run on a Long Day 5K

When:  Wednesday, June 19, 2019 – 7pm

Where:  Frankfort, Illinois

Distance:  5K – 3.1 Miles

Results:  21:31 Official time / 25th Overall / 2nd Place 55-59 Male Age Group

Results Link:  Race Results

I could make this an easy, two paragraph wrap-up, but why make it easy on myself?

Race day morning a coworker who works out at a local fitness club advised that a man had died while working out at her club the day before.  Knowing that I have a history of running she was quizzing me about why I thought he had died.  I could only speculate, but I figured that he probably had cardiac arrest related to heart disease and was triggered by exertion he was unprepared for.  She wanted to be assured that she wasn’t going to code out as well, so I dug up several articles about deaths at fitness clubs and found that the majority of exercise-related deaths are due to exactly what I had thought, they were not fit and had a history of heart disease.  But exercise in moderation is one of the best ways of preventing such deaths.  Her fears were soothed and said she won’t worry about dying on the treadmill.

But the conversation kind of stoked my fears a little.  My father died of heart disease at the age of 52.  He was a smoker, my mom fried a lot of our meals, and did no exercise whatsoever.  I took note of that at the age of 15 and have tried to live my life without such outside bad habits, and I started running in my early 20’s.  But I often find myself running short, high-intensity races at high heart rates which make me feel like I’m maxing myself out and wonder if I’m going to blow up my heart.  Thankfully, that hasn’t happened, and I am aware of the warning signs.  But it’s always kind of in the back of my mind.  As I stood on the starting line the thought of blowing up wasn’t even on my mind.  It was time to beat as many as I could.  Enough of the doom and gloom, on with the race report.

For a race that celebrates the first day of summer with a Wednesday night 5K, it was anything but summer-like.  Air temp was about 63 degrees and it was drizzling.  I debated as to whether I should race in a singlet or not but decided to do so.  I joined the local running club group photo and then did my warm up.

 

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I donned my new FNRC visor for the picture! (photo credit I believe goes to Susan Danforth’s phone – borrowed from Facebook.)

 

The course was changed this year, pretty much running it in reverse from previous years I have run this race.  I didn’t mind the change, except sometimes when you are seeing things you normally see in the latter parts of the race early on it kind of messes with me for some reason.  I put that behind me and tried to settle in without going out too fast, but as usual, I failed.

There’s a guy that runs this race pushing his handicapped wife in a racing stroller and in the past he has kicked my butt.  It’s always humbling when he beats me, and I marvel at his strength and ability.  He quickly jumped ahead of me and I decided to jump in behind him.  On the flats, he would put a pace or two on me, but when we hit the little rises in the road I would pull him back in.  As much as I try to hold back early in a race and run negative splits, I never do because I can’t turn off the competitive aspect of it.  I feared that he was making the same mistake that I was, heading out too strong, and we were going to pay for it later.

A little before the first mile I passed him and then worried about him the rest of the way.  I went through the first mile split in 6:42 according to my watch, and decided to pull back just a touch as we headed up the road and onward to the bike trail.  I was passed by another runner that had recently had a kidney transplant and said to him that it was me usually chasing him down.  He laughed and I asked how his health was and was said he was great and thanked me for asking.  Then he pulled away.

I went through the second mile split at 6:53 and was satisfied with that.  A girl passed me and I said “go get it” and she encouraged me to grab on and go with her, but I told her I was waiting for another 1/2 mile before kicking.  I mistakenly thought the course would continue on the path a little longer, but we turned off and hit the streets again.  After a couple of turns, we made it to the ending straight to the finish.  I glanced back at the trail and could see the stroller pushing runner not far back.  A quick look at my watch showed that I had about a 1/4 mile left so I kicked hard up the hill back to the finish and was all alone.  My watch showed 21:25, which is always quicker than the official time at this race.  I’m not sure why that happens, but the official time is always slower than my watch.  I was maybe five steps back from the starting line at the start, so there’s not much of a time difference there.

 

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I cooled down and then went and joined some others from the running club to cheer on the rest of the runners.  After a while, I got a little cold and went and changed into some dry clothes and waited for the results.  Glad to hear my name called for 2nd in my age group.  There’s lots of great competition at this race and to get an A/G medal is special.  I had a pretty good race.

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Race Report: 2018 Short Run on a Long Day 5K

When:  Wednesday, 06/20/2018 – 7 PM

Where:  Frankfort, IL

Distance:  5K

Results:  21:31 – 30th Overall, 1st M50-54 A/G – Link:  Race Results

To sum up this race in one word:  strange.  Of all the 5K’s I have done, this one always has a weird vibe to it.  The anxiety is different for me here.  I’m always a little more amped up for this race for some reason.  Today was no different.  There’s usually some good competition here, especially for a Wednesday night race.

First of all, this was my first hard effort in a race since running the Boston Marathon, a race I did not do very well at.  Oh sure, Boston had some extreme conditions, but I never really felt prepared for it and it seems that I had struggled with effort since.  My expectation was that I was not going to be able to run my typical sub-21 minute 5K.

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I joined in!  I’m next to Forrest Gump.

Then there’s the club vibe at this race.  The competitive aspect seems high for these clubs.  I follow the Frankfort/New Lenox Running Club online and have interacted with a few of the members, and tonight I decided to sport the club singlet and represent.  Although I tried to interact with them pre-race, I just kind of felt like an outsider.  That’s mostly on me, as I don’t really run with them much, mainly because they schedule their runs in the evenings when I’m doing dinner with the family, or early on Saturday morning when I would rather take my time getting up and around.  But I do value associating with them online.  The Tinley Track & Trail club is always competitive at this race, and I noticed a few other clubs this year as well.

I did my typical slow warm-up, a few quick up-tempo strides and then got in line at the start.  Ben and Emily joined in on the fun this year, and I positioned myself behind them.  The guy with the bullhorn started the race, not from the middle of the road this year for a change, and off we sped.  We weren’t a 1/4 mile into it when an 8 year old kid went in front of me from right to left.  He had his arms raised, flexing his muscles for some reason and we clipped feet and down he went.  Immediate dread filled me and I stopped to see if he was okay.  I hadn’t even got turned around and he was already up and running.  Must not have affected him much, because he finished in 32nd place.  Yes, the 8 year old kid that I accidently tripped when he cut me off almost beat me.

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The evidence clearly shows that number 9611 shoved this kid to the ground, your Honor! (photo by Jill Yott – Facebook)

Back to running again I found that I was pegging the heart rate into the red, in my typical fashion.  Not sure why I can’t hold back at the beginning of this race, but I go out too hard every time.  At one point I glanced at my watch and it said I was running sub-6 minute pace per mile.  Oops.  I dialed it back and hoped I could salvage a couple of miles around 7 min pace.

I saw Todd Street spectating somewhere near the 2.25 mile mark and said hello.  After that I was all about trying not to get passed, but it was happening with regularity.  I saw a couple grey haired guys pass me and I had the feeling that I wasn’t going to finish in the money.  With about a half mile to go we crested a hill and I used the downhill to make a final push.  The last 100 yards or so is uphill slightly, and I pushed as hard as I could while still checking my shoulder for the guy I passed.  I was able to hold him off.  I could see the clock and saw that I wasn’t going to break 21 minutes, which deflated me a little, but I was more worried about place than time at that point.

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My cardiovascular system really wanted this to be over at this point.  (photo by Todd Street)

I found Ben at the end and he said he had won the race.  Very proud of him.  He’s finished this race in 2nd way too many times.  Nice that he got the trophy this year, even if it is the most annoyingly big 5K 1st place trophy ever.  Emily did well too, grabbing 1st in her age group and 3rd overall for the females.

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Ben, myself and Emily looking happy post-race.
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Ben with another huge 1st Place trophy!
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The guy kept saying “look at Dad.” Is that prophecy?!?! At least he didn’t call me Grandpa.
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For the longest day of the year, the light was fading fast as they finally got to the old guy awards.

 

So I finished in 30th place, 14 places later than last year’s 16th place.  There were less faster old guys this year and a lot more kids.  There were 7 men in their 50’s in the top 30 last year, and this year there was just two.  Last year I finished in 20:45; this year more than a half minute slower.  It is a little bit of a head scratcher for me, as it seems that I am still feeling the effects of being over-trained the past year, or old age is just catching up with me.  I’m not really training to race 5K’s, but I do like to push myself and race them.  I just don’t like getting slower as the years pass.

Here’s last year’s recap for comparison:

Short Run on a Long Day 2017 Race Recap

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Of course Ben didn’t want to take the trophy home, so I was forced to do so.  Add it to the collection, I guess.

I was reviewing the race on Strava and saw this really cool Flyby feature that shows other Strava using runners in the race and how we ran.  Fun to watch.  I hope the link works.  Click on the orange start button to make it work.   Strava Flyby of the 5K

See you next year!

Short Run on a Long Day 2017 Race Recap

When:  6/21/2016, 7:00pm

Where:  Frankfort, Illinois

Distance:  5K

Results:  20:45 Official, 20:42 Garmin watch – 16th overall, 3rd place M50-54

I went into the my fourth running of this race with low expectations.  I haven’t really focused on any sort of short speed work due to training for Ironman Louisville, but that doesn’t mean I can’t give a 5K a try.  And by try I mean gunning as hard as I can.  But the race ended up being somewhat educational for me.

For this race I decided to wear my heart rate strap and monitor my heart rate through the 5K to see if my max HR is anywhere near the 220 bpm minus your age.  This method is an easy way to determine your max heart rate, which you can then use to set your heart rate zones to train in.  However, many don’t trust the calculation for some reason.  I’m 53 years old, so using the 220-age formula I should have a max heart rate of 167.

So if you are going to use a 5K to see where your max heart rate is you should do a little warm up then go all out at max effort for 5K.  So I strapped on my Garmin and the heart rate monitor strap and let it rip.  Here’s what it told me:

 

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Not sure why there is a 10 second difference in the moving time and the elapsed time.  That may explain the watch time vs. the official time.  Maybe I lost a little satellite connection somewhere on the run.  I did not stop for anything until the finish line.

 

And the 5K field test revealed a peak max heart rate of 169 bpm, with an average of 163 bpm.  And the times that I glanced at my watch during the race I usually saw 166 bpm staring back at me.  I guess the 220-age is accurate enough for me.

 

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I was also surprised to see that the Garmin nailed the 3.1 mile distance exactly.  

 

Okay, enough of the scientific stuff.  Back to the race.  I got there much later than I usually do and parked in the neighborhood next to the park where the race starts and ends near my friend Dian’s house.  Lo and behold, Dian was actually outside!  We chatted up ourselves a little bit and she thought the race had started already.  Silly Dian.  I explained that the runners will warm up prior to the race.  She thought that was nuts.  Gave me a chuckle though.

Over at the park, the usual suspects were there:  Frankfort/New Lenox Running Club made a strong showing, Tinley Track & Trail was also present.  Mr. Mustache Runner guy was there, with his shirt tucked in as usual.  And many more familiar faces.  It wasn’t until the race was almost ready to go when Nate Troester showed up at the start line, and I knew our eventual winner was finally here.

The guy that starts the race stands right in the middle of the road, orders us not to run him over, tells us not to start until he says “GO!” then proceeds to say “Okay, let’s go” prior to saying “On your mark, get set, GO!”  Park district run races can be really strange. In the old days, races were run by runners who kind of knew what they were doing, and these park district guys don’t look like they run much.  Anyway, at GO! we all took off and tried to avoid the dumb cherry picker thing in the path of the race route that has a guy up there with a camera.  So dumb.  You never see the pictures on their website or Facebook page, but damn, they got to have a cherry picker right on the road with a camera guy taking pictures that no one will ever see.

I had picked my mark, a guy named Chris S. who is in my age group and started just in front of me.  I decided to hold his pace for as long as I could.  That didn’t last long.  I might have held on to him for about a half mile before I could tell I had maxed out my heart rate without even looking at my watch.  I watched him pull away.  That move of trying to stay with him got me through the first mile with a 6:18 split.  NO BUENO!  So much for the negative split strategy.  He kicked my butt again, as usual.

After the first mile I decided to dial it back a touch and find my race pace comfort zone and found myself running with a guy wearing a Ironman Racine 70.3 t-shirt.  We were pacing together pretty well.  We turned off the path together and on to the side street to head back and about 1.5 miles into it we got passed by some kid.  “Damn kids” I muttered, and Racine man agreed.

We ran together until the 2 mile split (6:47 min/mile) and he started to pull just a little bit ahead.  I tried to match pace but I had spent too much energy on that first mile.  He pulled ahead about 50 yards with about a 1/2 mile to go and that’s how it ended.  The third mile split was 6:53 min/mile for me.

I checked the race results and learned Racine man was in my age group.  He got 15th place overall, 2nd in the age group.  Since this park district run race only awards the top 2 finishers in each age group with a medal, whereas most races go three deep, I knew I wasn’t going to add a medal to my medal rack this time around.  You win some, you lose some.

Here is page one the results:  Shortrun

Overall, it was a good race for me.  I found that the 220-minus age max heart rate calculation is nearly exact to my actual field tested heart rate.  I got to race some good competition.  And there was pizza at the finish line.

 

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A tie dye participant shirt.  Yay.  

 

2017 Summertime Stride 5K Race Report

When:  6/3/2017, 8:30 am

Where:  Mokena, Illinois

Distance:  5K

Results:  20:57 Official, 10th overall, 10th Male overall, 1st place M50-54

http://www.thtiming.com/images/2017_stride_overall.pdf

When I show up for a 5K I tend to start scanning the people gathered around, looking for the usual suspects, the people I will key on as my competition.  Since school was officially over for the high schools, I figured I would see a handful of high school age runners, fresh off of their track seasons, and there were a few.  I also saw this kid who looked about 9 (the results indicate he was 11), and he had the “look.”  Short running shorts, a set of wrap around sunglasses, and New Balance shoes that looked like racing flats.  It was about 40 minutes until start and he went out for his warm up.  I knew a runner when I saw one.  I also saw a guy wearing a Calvin College Track Team singlet who looked fast as well (he was the eventual winner).  It wasn’t until I saw Nate Troester, a local guy who wins every race, that I knew for sure that I certainly wasn’t going to win this race!

My wife Kari joined me in this race as it is walking distance from our house.  We walked down to the park about 3/4 of a mile away and signed up.  It was starting to get warm, and the race start time of 8:30 am was not helping.  Much too late to start a summertime race, in my opinion.  I tried talking Kari into gunning from the start, but she’s happy to run the race her way.  I was already starting to build adrenaline for the start time.

I did some easy warm up and then headed to the start line.  I’m always amazed at the number of slow people and kids at the front of the line.  One guy said he’s staying back to let the rabbits go, but this guy was in the front as well.  I dislike the tight corral type starts.  They are too crowded, and filled with too many slowpokes at the front of the pack.

A couple of minutes later a horn sounded and we were off.  I was surprised that many of the kids were holding tempo pretty good at the beginning, but by the time we got a half mile into it the first small climb appeared, and they started to drop off.  It was also in that first half mile that I was surprised to see Nate Troester standing there clapping for everyone.  I guess he was just hanging around.  I was happy to see that I had just picked up a finisher’s spot!

At the first mile, a local kid named Merrigan was running along with me and not far off the first place female.  We went through the first mile in 6:25 pace and I thought she would be good.  But later I found out she had a sore knee from an earlier mishap and ended up dropping out.  I kept pace behind the first girl for the next mile, as I also chased the one grey haired guy up ahead of me.  He was moving pretty well and not showing any signs of letting up.

After the turn around, we climbed the few remaining hills and settled in for the last mile.  I caught the first place girl and passed her.  I could see the grey haired guy up ahead, but he was pulling away, as was the kid with the sunglasses.  That kid knew what he was doing, running the tangents and basically picking off more and more runners.

I tried using the last downhill to pick up pace, using it to pass an 8th grade kid, and then accelerate through the last turn for the last 10th of a mile.  I couldn’t catch anyone ahead of me, and there was no one directly behind me to worry about, so I glided in across the finish in 20:57.

I grabbed a water and dumped it over my head to cool down.  I then walked back to the turn and waited with my daughter Rebecca for Kari to finish.  She came by looking very strong, but I tried to tell her that she was getting out-kicked by a 5 year old!  She didn’t care.  To get beat by a 5 year old would have killed me.

When the results were posted I was surprised to see that I finished 10th, and first in my age group.  I would have bet that the grey haired guy ahead of me was in my age group.  It turns out he was 58!  Smoking fast for 58!  I also checked the results for Kari and learned that she medaled as well, taking 3rd in her a/g!  Well done!

In all, it’s a fun local race, and I thoroughly enjoyed the run with my wife.

 

2016 Short Run on a Long Day Race Report

When:  6/15/2016, 7:00pm

Where:  Frankfort, Illinois

Distance:  5K

Results:  20:52 Official, 20:45 Garmin watch – 17th overall, 16th Male overall, 3rd place M50-54

I enjoy racing at the Frankfort Park District Short Run on a Long Day 5K for a couple of reasons.  First, it’s held on a midweek evening which means most of the day has passed and all you need to do is worry about running and not the million other things you have to do that day.  I also enjoy the fact that it brings out some good competition and allows me to race against a higher percentage of my faster peers.  At another local race that was run in my town in late April I would have finished second overall, so this race tells me more about myself than placing high in a race that had no competition.

The race day this year was hot – 89 degrees – when I checked the car thermometer.  I decided to not let that bother me, and I decided that I would push myself anyway.  During warm-up I was jogging shirtless past a couple of moms who were pushing their kids in strollers.  One of the kids said “Daddy!” which prompted me to chuckle and say “Daddy must be hairy too.”  That seemed to get me in a good mood.

The start was typical, too many slowpokes in the front that I would have to navigate around.  One guy asked another what time he was shooting for and the guy said around 21 minutes.  That guy I thought had a chance at that.  But when he asked the other guy, said he wasn’t sure, “maybe 22 or 23” minutes.  I immediately thought of the movie Mr. Mom when he responded 220 / 221 – whatever it takes.  This guy looked like he would be over 25 minutes to me.

As usual my son Ben also ran the race.  He did his typical college runner thing in warm-ups, and then found an old high school buddy to run the race with.  He made his way to the front of the line at the last minute.  Must be cool to have the speed to back that up!  He finished second overall for the 3rd year in a row I think.  He keeps losing to the same guy.  Not really fair for Ben, as he is coming off a mandatory 2 week recovery period from track season.  And he had a head cold.  I’m guessing he’ll beat this guy someday.

The guy that starts the race likes to stand right in the middle of the road and warn people not to run him over when the race starts.  I find that to be the dumbest thing, but typical of a race that is run by the park district versus a race that is run by a runner or running club.  He hit the siren on the bullhorn, snapped a picture and we all took off.  I was hitting Z4 heart rate within the first 1/4 mile.  The group spread out pretty quickly and I focused on getting my breathing rhythm under control.  The first mile hit and I missed the water stop.  I was getting quite a dry mouth, but I didn’t worry about it.  For some reason the water stop was positioned on the left hand side of the trail we were running on, and in my opinion it should have been on the right.  When running on a trail, all users should stay right, and there were definitely other bikes and trail users on the trail that would force us over.  Matter of fact, one kid that passed me around the 1/2 mile mark shouted “BIKER UP!” which startled me somewhat, but had he not yelled that I may have not seen the guy.

When we hit the one mile marker another guy got on my shoulder and asked how I was doing.  Apparently he was feeling me out.  I said I was doing good.  He mentioned that he thought the split on the clock was too fast, and I agreed.  My watch split said about 6:15 for the first mile.  He tried to talk some more but I zipped it and focused on catching the next guy.  I dropped him and never saw him again.

When we made the turn off the trail and onto the side streets I started to catch a lot of guys that had gone out too fast.  From that point, about 1.5 miles into the race, I kind of fell into no man’s land again.  This happens to me a lot, I end up being the slowest of the faster runners or the faster of the mid-packers.  I don’t remember passing or being passed from that point on.

Around the two mile marker I saw a lady by a table that had cups of water on it.  Apparently she was the sole worker for that water stop, but it was on the far side of the road on a turn, which meant that I would not be able to take the tangent if I wanted to get some water.  Since I was really hot, I decided to make a try at it and she met me halfway.  I took the cup and splashed it on me.  What happened next was a surprise – I almost felt hotter!  Not sure if the temp of the water was an issue, or that I was just too hot for it to do anything.  I can remember my tri buddy Alex mentioning this once, and I took note.

I could feel myself starting to fade, but between mile 2 and 3 there are a lot of turns, which meant I could look back and see how close runners were behind me.  There was no one around that I was worried about.  I came upon a guy who said good job and was spraying a hose for us to stay cool.  But again, he was on the side of the street that would require me to move over from the straightest line to get relief.  It was too late to take him up on the water anyway, as I was determined to kick to the end.

Once I got to the last tenth of a mile I knew I had no challengers, but I pushed myself anyway.  My son was there yelling at me to go all in, a payback in a way for all the times I yelled at him in junior high and high school to push harder.  Now that he is a D-III runner, I usually just yell “Good Job!” or “GO Ben!”

My watch said 20:45 at the end, which was a little disappointing seeing that it wasn’t as fast as I thought I could run, nor as fast as I thought I was running.  But seeing that it was so hot, I guess it is a pretty respectable time, all things considered.

Race results:  http://www.frankfortparks.org/special-events/Short%20Run/2016%20short%20run%20overall.pdf